A Judoka for Life!

19
May
2017

Montreal, May 19, 2017 – A judo bout is an intense four-minute adrenalin rush where the object is to avoid finding oneself lying on one’s back on the tatamis. Rashad Chin felt that rush many times throughout his youth, but although he still practices the sport at an elite level, it’s no longer his sole daily source of adrenalin.

The Edmonton native completed medical school in 2008 and now works in the emergency department of the University of Alberta Hospital, where he fights to save lives every day.

“It’s a fascinating career. I have the privilege of helping people who are facing difficulties. It’s like solving a puzzle every time: I have to figure out what needs to be done to help them get better. Every day is different. I never know what’s going to happen next,” noted Chin.

His judo training has helped him throughout his medical career. With hard work, dedication, and perseverance, he has pursued his dream of becoming both a doctor and an accomplished judoka.

“It’s funny because the two fundamental principles of judo are maximum efficiency with minimum effort and mutual welfare and benefit, both of which also apply to my work. In the emergency department, we have to be extremely efficient to solve problems as quickly as possible, and the purpose of our work is the welfare of others,” explained Chin, who has been practising judo for more than 27 years.

Despite his heavy workload and the demands of his job, he still manages to train and compete and he has stood on the podium at the Canadian Championships on more than one occasion.

“I have a very busy schedule. Often, I go to the gym directly from work and it’s not rare for me to train in the morning after having worked all night. It’s definitely intense, but when you’re passionate about something, you find ways to make it work.”

In Chin’s opinion, it is just as important to be efficient on the tatamis as it is when managing a schedule. “It’s important to establish what your priorities are and then invest time in them. Judo is one of my priorities. Working at the hospital, I see that the people who remain in good health as they get older are the ones who maintain healthy and active lifestyles,” he explained.

During the Canadian Championships Presented by biosports.team, which are being held from May 25 to 28, Chin will swap his scrubs for a judo gi as he attempts to snag one of the titles in his weight division at the senior and veterans level.

“Some people tell me I’m too old to compete, but I find that strange. I don’t believe it. If you love judo, then you need to keep pushing the limits to continue practising it. I don’t believe that age is an obstacle,” he declared.

Chin remembers competing in his first Nationals in 1996 and is looking forward to showing his fans in Alberta what he is still capable of.

A Wonder Duo in Kata Judo

Albertans Kelly Palmer and Gordon Okamura are on fire. The two judokas have won 17 gold medals, eight silver, and four bronze at the Canadian Championships over the years.

The Kata experts also hold two national records. They are the only judokas to have won five medals in the five Katas at a single Canadian Championships event, a feat they accomplished in Toronto in 2012 with three golds and two silvers.

They are also the only team to have won national titles in the five Katas.

The Palmer-Okamura team will definitely be one to watch at the Canadian Championships Presented by biosports.team. “Gordon and I have set all our records together. I wouldn’t have made it this far without him,” commented Palmer. “We’re definitely going to try to add to our medal collection this year!”

The Kata events will begin on May 25 at 1:00 p.m.

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2017 Canadian Open Judo Championships presented by biosports.team website: www.judonationals.org

Livestream of the competition here

Information :
Patrick Esparbès
Chief Operating Officer
(514) 668-6279
p.esparbes@judocanada.org

© 2017 Canadian Kodokan Black Belt Association, All rights reserved

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